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Her little sister, Suzy, was doing the same thing down the hall.

The house was quiet, save the keyboard tapping in the girls' rooms, when the odd little instant message popped up on Melissa's screen—an IM from Suzy.

For the next couple of weeks, the girls remained watchful for malware, insidious software capable of wreaking all sorts of havoc.

Yet from its promotional materials, it seems not to be overly interested in the former's critical-but-not-hysterical engagement with how individuals are using the deep web/dark net to create a world beyond the reach of meatspace regulators who mostly fear everything they don't understand.

Reason's Zach Weissmueller sat down with Winter in August to discuss the life sentence of Ulbricht and other topics.

Every online scam begins more or less the same—a random e-mail, a sketchy attachment.

But every so often, a new type of hacker comes along. He secretly burrows his way into your hard drive, then into your life. It was a Saturday night, not much happening in her Long Beach, California, neighborhood, so high school senior Melissa Young was home messing around on her computer.

The agents had worked some of the biggest cases to come through the cyber program, taking down the stalker of ESPN sportscaster Erin Andrews and busting up Operation Phish Phry—one of the largest online fraud rings ever, which netted the crooks about

Yet from its promotional materials, it seems not to be overly interested in the former's critical-but-not-hysterical engagement with how individuals are using the deep web/dark net to create a world beyond the reach of meatspace regulators who mostly fear everything they don't understand.

Reason's Zach Weissmueller sat down with Winter in August to discuss the life sentence of Ulbricht and other topics.

Every online scam begins more or less the same—a random e-mail, a sketchy attachment.

But every so often, a new type of hacker comes along. He secretly burrows his way into your hard drive, then into your life. It was a Saturday night, not much happening in her Long Beach, California, neighborhood, so high school senior Melissa Young was home messing around on her computer.

The agents had worked some of the biggest cases to come through the cyber program, taking down the stalker of ESPN sportscaster Erin Andrews and busting up Operation Phish Phry—one of the largest online fraud rings ever, which netted the crooks about $1.5 million.

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Yet from its promotional materials, it seems not to be overly interested in the former's critical-but-not-hysterical engagement with how individuals are using the deep web/dark net to create a world beyond the reach of meatspace regulators who mostly fear everything they don't understand.Reason's Zach Weissmueller sat down with Winter in August to discuss the life sentence of Ulbricht and other topics. Every online scam begins more or less the same—a random e-mail, a sketchy attachment.But every so often, a new type of hacker comes along. He secretly burrows his way into your hard drive, then into your life. It was a Saturday night, not much happening in her Long Beach, California, neighborhood, so high school senior Melissa Young was home messing around on her computer.The agents had worked some of the biggest cases to come through the cyber program, taking down the stalker of ESPN sportscaster Erin Andrews and busting up Operation Phish Phry—one of the largest online fraud rings ever, which netted the crooks about $1.5 million.

.5 million.

But this case was unlike anything they'd encountered before. And while sex was a factor, it wasn't his only motivation. At the FBI offices, the agents comforted Amy, who shook uncontrollably, unable to collect herself.

Kirkpatrick, a programming expert, spent over a decade working in information security in the private sector.

While Rogers often takes the lead consoling victims and grilling suspects, Kirkpatrick can wade through thousands of lines of code to find the slightest abnormality.

, an eight-part reality show that will "cover deep web topics like bio-hacking, porn addiction, and the webcam sex trade." From the writeup at The Wrap, it sounds like eight episodes of unrelieved hysteria jacked directly out of Janet Reno's cerebral cortex circa 1995.

The deep dive will also cover cyber-kidnapping, digital warfare, and online cults.

Finally, a program that tackles online porn addiction, webcam businesss, and online cults! Which isn't to say you shouldn't bother with , which debuted earlier this year and explores the world of Bitcoin, hacking, encryption, and related issues through the trial and conviction of Ross Ulbricht, the founder of Silk Road, the anonymous, extra-legal online market whose growth and success mainstreamed the concept of the dark net.