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Patriarchs from Adam to Terah, the father of Abraham, are said to be older by as much as 100 years or more when they begat their named son in the Greek Septuagint than they were in the Latin Vulgate (Genesis 5; Genesis 11) or the Hebrew Tanakh (Gen 5; Gen 11).

He used it to identify the years in the Easter tables that he prepared.He did not use the notation to date historical events.In 1422 [CE], Portugal became the last country of western Europe to adopt the Anno Domini..." notation.Until the eighteenth century CE, the term Anno Salutis ("in the year of salvation") or Anno Nostrae Salutis ("in the year of our salvation"), Anno Salutis Humanae ("in the year of the salvation of men"), and Anno Reparatae Salutis ("in the year of accomplished salvation") were sometimes used in place of AD. "Only Rosten's Joys of Yiddish comments on these abbreviations that they have long been popular with Jewish scholars who were uncomfortable with a christological dating system. Unfortunately I can find no information to hand on just how long this has been a common practice, or if it indeed originated with Jewish scholars."CE and BCE came into use in the last few decades, perhaps originally in Ancient Near Eastern studies, where: (a) there are many Jewish scholars and (b) dating according to a Christian era is irrelevant. 18th century, when a great deal of PC work went on. Not that dictionaries are universally fair to Christians (check out some definitions of _jesuitical_ and _pontificate_)." "The term 'Common Era' is traced back in English to its appearance as 'Vulgar Era' (from the Latin word vulgus, the common people, i.e.

I have seen it called the Christian era, so that removing Christ did not work for some. those who are not royalty), to distinguish it from the Regnal dating systems typically used in national law.There are many religious calendars in existence, but each is normally in use in one region of the world -- typically by followers of a single religion.Almost all of the world's religious calendars are based on religion, astrology, or myth: The division between BC/BCE and AD/CE is not based on religious considerations.Most theologians and religious historians believe that Yeshua of Nazareth (Jesus) was born during a Fall -- or less likely during a Spring, sometime between 7 and 4 BCE.However, we have seen estimates as as early as the second century BCE and as late as 4 CE.At the time, "vulgar" meant "of or belonging to the common people." Even today, one can occasionally see the abbreviation "e.v." or "EV" used. In the middle 19th century, Alexander Campbell, wrote: This does not appear to be universally followed. I have made some inquiries and will let you know if I find anything more definite.